Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Trust and Innovation - 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer

The 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer found that countries with higher trust levels overall also show a greater willingness to trust new business innovations.

Building trust is essential to successfully bringing new products and services to market, and building trust in new business innovations requires that companies demonstrate clear personal and societal benefits, behave with integrity and engage with customers and stakeholders throughout the process.

Trust is a forward-facing metric of stakeholder expectation. It is an asset that institutions must understand and properly build in order to be successful in today’s complex world. We look at trust around the world, trust across industries and how to build trust.

Trust is also an important factor in driving market acceptance of new business innovations. The 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer finds that more than half of the global informed public believe that the pace of development and change in business today is too fast, that business innovation is driven by greed and money rather than a desire to improve people’s lives and that there is not enough government regulation of many industry sectors.

Toward Trusted Innovation

Countries with higher trust levels overall also show a greater willingness to trust new business innovations. Building trust is essential to successfully bringing new products and services to market, and building trust in new business innovations requires that companies demonstrate clear personal and societal benefits, behave with integrity and engage with customers and stakeholders throughout the process.

This year’s Trust Barometer offers key insights into the factors that increase and decrease trust, and defines a new formula for building trusted innovation.

Source: 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer - Trust and Innovation

Creativity in communication management consulting



Matthias Graf, CEO of Burson-Marsteller Switzerland, shares insights on the key factors to ensure good communication mangement consulting, illustrating the value of creativity and trust in the co-creation process between client and consultant. 

Monday, February 2, 2015

​Becoming a communication freelancer: is it right for you?

By Nadira Love, the Centre


One of the ongoing dilemmas in this current economic climate is deciding whether to become a freelance worker or a contracted employee. Most people would naturally assume that the key differences are heavily influenced by the financial implications. However, there are a number of other factors to take into consideration when making such a life-altering decision.

The pros


The idea of becoming a freelance worker may seem quite daunting at first, particularly if you've been working under a permanent contract for some time. There are definitely some obvious advantages to working for someone else: a stable income over a sustained period of time; being eligible for paid time off work; and so on. However, there are many benefits to freelancing as opposed to working directly for a company.


Before joining the Centre in June, I'd been freelancing for over three years at a range of organisations (predominantly within the television and film industry which is known to be over-populated with this kind of work). Initially, this worked out to be extremely useful as I was also studying at University so choosing when and where I worked was a perfect fit for my lifestyle.


I was able to develop a wider-range of unique skills and experience as a result of working with different organisations. This enabled me to enrich my CV and appeal to organisations from different industries.


As a freelancer I found there was more negotiation in my role at work as opposed to simply being told what to do, increasing my ability to work creatively and willingly on my own projects.

I also found that in most cases, I received more money for the work that I did and was able to claim back some of my daily expenses, such as travel and lunches. I found this very liberating and it felt great to be my own boss!

The cons


But, as my mum used to tell me - “With more freedom comes more responsibility!” And this is definitely the case freelancing.


One of the drawbacks of this work is being solely accountable for declaring income and covering your taxes. Being meticulous with figures is essential. It’s also important to plan any holidays well in advance so that they don't clash with important deadlines or any potential work that you may be offered... And, of course, managing your finances appropriately so that you can afford to take one.


Another limitation of the 'freelance work- style' is that it can occasionally be quite socially isolating. Freelance work often consists of long hours, working from home and working independently. Sometimes you’re working with a team on a project or contact but it’s difficult to maintain the relationships formed with other workers when the contact comes to an end. However, this can also be a relief if you have had to tolerate difficult or challenging personalities during this period of time!

Quality of life vs Quantity of time


Despite these drawbacks, it appears that working as a freelancer is becoming more and more popular. Not only with individuals who want to have more control over their working life but with employers too.


For many employers, they don’t have to worry about providing freelancers with office space, supplies or expensive electronic equipment - not to mention paying for sick pay or holidays. Freelancers offer employers flexibility and specialism without the induction training and employment contract.


Ultimately, the decision to go freelance can rest on your values - whether you value 'quality of life' (freelance) over 'quantity of time' (contracted employee). The great thing is freelance work is flexible and something that doesn't ever have to end, even after retirement years! It’s your choice.


Nadira Love is the Centre's In-company Training Coordinator. Whether it's a one-off awayday for a senior management team or a rolling programme for all staff, Nadira will work with you to make sure you get the most from your training.

Source: Becoming a freelancer: is it right for you? | the-centre.